A Course T-shirt is a traditional garment produced privately by members of the Canadian Forces. It is a T-shirt done up with the name of a military course as well as the names of all graduates and instructional staff. The T-shirts are usually privately purchased and are not worn with the uniform, intended for off-duty wear with civilian dress, or as a souvenir.

Course T shirt

A long-sleeved shirt is a type of shirt, often misinterpreted as a T-Shirt, in the style of a T-shirt, which the original kind is short-sleeved, but with long sleeves. It has been an acceptable piece of fashion since the 1970s. Since the mid-1980s, it has often been worn underneath a short-sleeved T-shirt for a nice-looking, warm combination. That style is typically done in the fall and winter. Long sleeve T-Shirts are also becoming a common summer garmet for younger generations, due to indoor air conditioning, and the concern of sunburn.

Long Sleeve T-shirt

Long sleeve T-Shirts are also becoming a common summer garment for younger generations, due to indoor air conditioning, and the concern of sunburn.

A concert T-shirt is a T-shirt that is associated with a concert or a concert tour, usually rock or metal. Bands and musical groups often promote themselves by creating and selling or giving away T-shirts at their shows, tours, and events. A concert T-shirt typically contains silk screened graphics of the name, logo, or image of a musical performer.

One popular graphic on the rear of the T-shirts is a listing of information about the band's current tour, including tour cities (sometimes specifying venues) and corresponding dates. One of the most popular colors for concert T-shirts is a flat black. Fans purchase or obtain these shirts to wear to future concerts, often with jeans, dark colored trousers or skirts. Fans may wear the shirt of one band to a concert of another to show their taste in a particular type of music or loyalty to another band or type of music.

Concert T-shirt

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Tshirt printing brings you this lesson in history:

May 31, 1859

Big Ben goes into operation in London

The famous tower clock known as Big Ben, located at the top of the 320-foot-high St. Stephen's Tower, rings out over the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, London, for the first time on this day in 1859. 

After a fire destroyed much of the Palace of Westminster--the headquarters of the British Parliament--in October 1834, a standout feature of the design for the new palace was a large clock atop a tower. The royal astronomer, Sir George Airy, wanted the clock to have pinpoint accuracy, including twice-a-day checks with the Royal Greenwich Observatory. While many clockmakers dismissed this goal as impossible, Airy counted on the help of Edmund Beckett Denison, a formidable barrister known for his expertise in horology, or the science of measuring time. 

Denison's design, built by the company E.J. Dent & Co., was completed in 1854; five years later, St. Stephen's Tower itself was finished. Weighing in at more than 13 tons, its massive bell was dragged to the tower through the streets of London by a team of 16 horses, to the cheers of onlookers. Once it was installed, Big Ben struck its first chimes on May 31, 1859. Just two months later, however, the heavy striker designed by Denison cracked the bell. Three more years passed before a lighter hammer was added and the clock went into service again. The bell was rotated so that the hammer would strike another surface, but the crack was never repaired. 

The name "Big Ben" originally just applied to the bell but later came to refer to the clock itself. Two main stories exist about how Big Ben got its name. Many claim it was named after the famously long-winded Sir Benjamin Hall, the London commissioner of works at the time it was built. Another famous story argues that the bell was named for the popular heavyweight boxer Benjamin Caunt, because it was the largest of its kind.